Statistics

/Statistics

Occupational Outlook Handbook: Librarians (2016)

By | 2017-11-24T16:12:31+00:00 November 24th, 2017|Categories: Reports/Plans, Statistics, Trends|

Excerpt: Employment of librarians is projected to grow 9 percent from 2016 to 2026, about as fast as the average for all occupations.

https://www.bls.gov/ooh/Education-Training-and-Library/Librarians.htm#tab-6

Communities are increasingly turning to libraries for a variety of services and activities. Therefore, there will be a continuous need for librarians to manage libraries and help patrons find information. Parents value the learning opportunities that libraries present for children because libraries are able to provide children with information they often cannot access from home. In addition, the increased availability of electronic information is also expected to increase the demand for librarians in research and special libraries, where patrons will need help sorting through the large amount of digital information.

However, budget limitations, especially in local government and educational services, may limit growth for libraries and librarians.

Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Librarians,
on the Internet at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/education-training-and-library/librarians.htm.

Occupational Employment and Wages, May 2016
25-4021 Librarians

Administer libraries and perform related library services. Work in a variety of settings, including public libraries, educational institutions, museums, corporations, government agencies, law firms, non-profit organizations, and healthcare providers. Tasks may include selecting, acquiring, cataloguing, classifying, circulating, and maintaining library materials; and furnishing reference, bibliographical, and readers’ advisory services. May perform in-depth, strategic research, and synthesize, analyze, edit, and filter information. May set up or work with databases and information systems to catalogue and access information.

National estimates for this occupation
Industry profile for this occupation
Geographic profile for this occupation

Article: Outcomes, Impacts, and Indicators (2015)

By | 2017-11-09T19:56:53+00:00 November 9th, 2017|Categories: Marketing, Outcomes, Programs, Statistics, Tools|

Outcomes, Impacts, and Indicators
By Samantha Becker
September 18, 2015

Edited Extract:

“Despite all the attention and advice about program evaluation, those responsible for carrying it out still struggle to define their program outcomes, connect those to their program goals  (impact), and figure out how to measure them (indicators).

Librarians often have difficulty talking about what we do in terms of concrete benefits; instead, we often default to the loftiest of our many missions: defending democracy, advancing freedom of thought, instilling the love of reading…. While these deeply held values of our profession should guide our ethics and decision-making, we still have a need and an obligation to measure what outcomes we can and demonstrate our impact on the multitudes who benefit from public libraries in real and significant ways.

Theory of change work is another way of organizing indicators and structuring program information. Instead of using the logic model, the program is connected through a series of “so that” statements that show a progression of steps an individual takes through a program and the change each step is to encourage along the way. The logic model can also be overlaid on the theory of change. The theory of change approach can be helpful if a program is started because someone had a great idea, but no one is quite sure how or whether it will work. In that case, sometimes it’s easier to use the theory of change backward, starting by asking what program participants need to know, have, or do in order to improve their lives or their communities and then working back into your program design.

An example that is seen a lot these days: someone wants to create a Maker space. A local foundation is willing to give a grant, but the library has to fill out a logic model and explain how success will be measured. Many librarians will start with what goes into the Maker space and then what kinds of programs will be held there. Yet when it comes to defining outcomes, they are stumped. “I just want the kids to have fun. How do I define fun as an outcome?” is a common refrain heard at library conferences (and in private mutterings over grant applications).

Theory of change work helps break through these blocks. It asks how and why over and over again until responses are exhausted. If it can’t be defined as a measurable outcome, it hasn’t been sufficiently ­interrogated.

Having fun is a worthy and measurable indicator of a satisfying event or program—it’s an output in this context—but an outcome needs to be connected to a higher level goal that resonates with the community and funders, and the indicator needs to be specifically connected to that. That doesn’t mean you have to (or can) prove that coming to a library Maker space leads to better school performance, but it means that you can show, theoretically, how your program could contribute to better school performance.

The theory of change also tells you what to measure—you are testing your theory.

  • Can the kids make the 3-D game pieces? How many did they make?
  • Did the kids play the game? How many played? How many came back to play again?
  • How many came to the library for other reasons? How many times? What else did they do?

When first doing this work, it’s best to write down most every indicator you can think of that can answer your evaluation questions and prove or disprove your theory of change. Then, starting with whether the indicator measures something that matters, start whittling down the list, getting rid of what doesn’t meet the criteria for a good indicator. Once that’s done, methods for data collection can be considered, with survey questions reserved for indicators that can’t be collected by any other method.

A final word: be creative with your methods. Want to know how many unique program participants you have? Try a loyalty card. Want to know how many participants in a digital literacy class learned how to send email? Have them send a message to the library with a particular subject heading and keep a log.”

The Impact Survey was first used in 2009 to help gather data for the Opportunity for All study reports, conducted by the University of Washington’s iSchool with assistance from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

http://lj.libraryjournal.com/2015/09/managing-libraries/outcomes-impacts-and-indicators/#

EU PUBLIC LIBRARIES Country Factsheets

By | 2017-10-15T00:42:21+00:00 October 15th, 2017|Categories: Reports/Plans, Statistics|

By empowering individuals, Europe’s 65,000 public libraries build stronger communities and change lives.

The goal of the Public Libraries 2020 programme (PL2020) is to raise awareness about the importance of public libraries as modern learning hubs close to citizens and (potential) learners. Public libraries have been expanding their role in local communities enormously over the last decades – many of them now help people develop their digital skills, advance or acquire other skills (such as literacy) through various lifelong learning opportunities and offer a neutral and trusted space for people to create, learn, and connect.

The PL2020 programme is run by The Reading & Writing Foundation (in Dutch: Stichting Lezen & Schrijven), which was founded in 2004 by H.R.H. Princess Laurentien of the Netherlands with the aim of structurally solving illiteracy in the Netherlands. Over the course of the years, The Reading & Writing Foundation has also started working towards this goal internationally. We bring literacy problems to the attention of both the general public and politicians, as well as offering nationwide support to hundreds of municipalities, institutions, companies, teachers and volunteers in the education sector.

EU LIBRARY COUNTRY FACTSHEETS 2017

France2017libcountryfactsheet

Reading & Writing Foundation
http://www.publiclibraries2020.eu/
Avenue de Broqueville, 40
1200 Woluwe-Saint-Lambert
Belgium

TOOL: ROI – Library Use Value Calculator

By | 2017-09-25T23:47:50+00:00 September 25th, 2017|Categories: Marketing, Statistics, Tools|

Return on Investment
LIBRARY USE VALUE CALCULATOR
Figuring out your public service return on investment is a great way to tell the story about how valuable your library is to the community. Click here to download the customized excel spreadsheet, or here.

Communication Services provides Library Advocacy Services

Since 2005, Communication Services has worked with dozens of libraries to help them achieve financial stability and sustainability. Now that libraries must live within a 2% Tax Cap World, it is more important than ever for libraries to make sure they are seen as an essential community services that deserve funding because of the important programs and services they provide.

MORE: Customization of a Library Use Value Calculator from the Maine State Library
http://www.maine.gov/msl/services/customcal.htm

IFLA: Library Trend Report, 2016

By | 2017-09-23T17:38:05+00:00 September 23rd, 2017|Categories: Reports/Plans, Statistics, Trends|

The IFLA Trend Report https://trends.ifla.org/update-2016 identifies five top level trends which will play a key role in shaping our future information ecosystem:

  • TREND 1 New Technologies will both expand and limit who has access to information.
  • TREND 2 Online Education will democratise and disrupt global learning.
  • TREND 3 The boundaries of privacy and data protection will be redefined..
  • TREND 4 Hyper-connected societies will listen to and empower new voices and groups.
  • TREND 5 The global information environment will be transformed by new technologies.

    The International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA) is the leading international body representing the interests of library and information services and their users. It is the global voice of the library and information profession.

    Founded in 1927 in Edinburgh, Scotland at an international conference, we celebrate our 90th birthday in 2017. We now have more than 1,400 Members in over 140 countries around the world. IFLA was registered in the Netherlands in 1971. The Royal Library, the national library of the Netherlands, in The Hague, generously provides the facilities for our headquarters.

 

IFLA: Library Map of the World

By | 2017-09-23T14:27:43+00:00 September 23rd, 2017|Categories: Statistics, Trends|

IFLA Library Map of the World is a representative source of basic library statistics and a robust tool providing country-level data and a worldwide comparison of different library performance metrics by region.

Libraries are leading promoters and providers of free access to all types of information to all citizens. To show the potential of the global library field, the Library Map of the World features all types of libraries, including national, academic, public, community, school, and special libraries. The initial set of performance metrics include number of libraries, number of libraries providing internet access, number of staff and volunteers, number of registered users and visitors, and number of loans.

Selected library performance metrics provide national level library data across all types of libraries in all regions of the world. Adjust map view settings to search by country and explore worldwide totals.

The International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA), is the leading international body representing the interests of library and information services and their users. It is the global voice of the library and information profession.

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